BIOE 5101 and 5102

Bioethics and Medical Humanities I and II

Instructors: Lauren Flicker, Danielle Spencer, and Tia Powell

Description:
This year-long course can be taken independently to earn a Certificate and/or as required coursework for the Master of Science in Bioethics. Faculty collaborate with students in a combination of two retreats and weekly seminars to offer an intellectually rich year introducing the foundations of bioethics as a field, key principles in moral theory, methods of legal and literary analysis, and the skills necessary to apply the insights of bioethics in our daily practice and research. We examine core bioethics issues using a multiplicity of perspectives and draw upon the depth of expertise not only of faculty but also of our participants, many of whom bring years of clinical, legal and other professional experience to the program.

Prerequisites: None.

Credit: 6

Academic Integrity Academic Honesty: Studying and working in bioethics requires the highest standards of integrity. Students are expected to follow the university community's high standards of honesty and professionalism throughout the program. They are also expected to show seriousness and intellectual dedication, respect for the views and convictions of others, concern for the impact of advanced knowledge on society at large, regard for instructors, fellow students and the program as a whole and, above all, adherence to the highest ethical and moral standards in their personal and professional lives. Research and Submitted Work: Maintenance of good standing while a student in the program is, in part, dependent on developing and maintaining standards of ethical and professional conduct. It is expected and assumed that all submissions of examinations, course assignments, capstone projects and other degree requirements are the student’s own work and that any work by others included in student submissions will be fully credited and cited. Evidence to the contrary will result in penalties which may include failure in the course, disciplinary dismissal, or such other penalties as are deemed proper. Plagiarism: More specifically, plagiarism is the use of the ideas, words or work of another without due attribution. Acts of plagiarism are inconsistent with scholarly and ethical inquiry, and represent an unacceptable breach of professional standards. When the instructor finds that a student's work is plagiarized the student will receive an F in the course; transcripts will accurately and permanently reflect a failing final grade. Additional sanctions may occur at the discretion of program faculty. Note: Students concerned about the proper method for attributing the work of other scholars are encouraged to consult with the instructor. The official Einstein policy document can be found here. Academic Status Full and Part-Time Status: Matriculated students are considered full-time when they register for eight (8) seminar credits per semester. Half-time students are those registered for four (4) credits per semester. Part-time students are those matriculated who register for fewer than four (4) credits per semester. Academic or Personal Leave of Absence: The Program Director may grant an Academic or Personal Leave of Absence for a period of three months to a maximum of twelve months. This may be considered appropriate if the student is experiencing academic problems involving personal issues, conflicts, or the need for counseling beyond normal tutoring. Students considering a leave should be in conversation with the Program Director and Registrar several weeks in advance of applying for leave and should submit a formal application before the beginning of a given semester. Please see the appropriate section of the Program Handbook for procedures. International Students: As a condition of maintaining student status, all international students must pursue a “full course of study.” Therefore the Academic or Personal Leave of Absence is not available to international students. There are limited exceptions to this, and approval must be granted by the Program Director, Einstein Registrar and the ISSO (International Students and Scholars Office) as regulations change frequently. In the event that an already matriculated international student has difficulty in fulfilling visa requirements to re-enter the U.S. and is more than thirty days past the agreed date of return, the ISSO must be contacted immediately. Sick Leave and Medical Leave of Absence: The Program Director may place a student on a temporary Medical Leave of Absence in case of prolonged illness or other medical emergency. This leave may also be appropriate in the case of chronic physical or mental illness. At the beginning of a Medical Leave of Absence, the student must submit a Leave of Absence form, and upon return from the Leave of Absence, the student must formally notify the Registrar. Extended Medical Leaves of Absence over a longer period, generally six months to a maximum of twelve months, will be granted only with the approval of the Program Director. Students who absent themselves from the masters or certificate program without notice may be subject to disciplinary actions, including dismissal. The official Einstein policy document can be found here. Grading Policy Evaluative Grades: As of Fall 2011, performance in all BIOE courses offered through Einstein are given final evaluations on the following grading scale: Honors (H) Pass (P) Fail (F) Pass (P) is awarded for work earning a B or higher, the one exception being A+ work that goes beyond the stipulated demands of the course, for which Honors (H) is reserved. Work earning B- or below is not typically given a P. Note: Non-BIOE courses (such as those offered by Cardozo Law School) may be evaluated with a letter grade, which when applied toward the MBE degree can be converted by our Registrar, using the scale above, with transcript notation. Administrative Grades: Administrative actions in all courses may be given one of the following grades: G (dropped by student without permission = failure) I (Incomplete) W (withdrawal without penalty or prejudice) Incomplete Grade Policy: All coursework must be completed by the end of the semester in which the course is taken. Students should not assume that an instructor will automatically grant a mark of Incomplete if work is missing. Students should email the course instructor in advance of the last day of class/exam date to request an incomplete and indicate when all missing work will be submitted. An email from the instructor confirming the work required to remove the incomplete should be sent to the Program Director. Note: A mark of “I” (Incomplete) cannot be carried for more than one semester. Special permission from the Program Director is required to carry an incomplete for more than one semester. Class Non-Attendance Policy: Students are permitted to miss no more than one session per course in a given semester. Permission of the instructor is required for additional absences. Any student with more than 3 absences in a course will be given an automatic grade of G. The official Einstein policy document can be found here. Maintenance of Academic Standards Academic Probation: A student who, during a semester, Fails a course or receives an excessive number of Incompletes is placed on academic probation for the following semester. If in any subsequent semester another course is failed, or the student receives an Incomplete, the student may be dropped from the program at the discretion of the program faculty. Note: No course in which a grade of F, G, W or I is in standing can be credited to the Certificate or Masters degree. Performance Review: If a student is placed on probation, a faculty committee appointed by the Program Director will review performance with the student and determine whether withdrawal is required. The committee will develop a remediation plan for a student permitted to continue their program of study. Academic Discipline: A student’s admission, continued enrollment, receipt of academic credits, graduation, and the conferring of any degree, diploma, or certificate on the student are entirely subject to the disciplinary powers of the program and dependent upon the student maintaining high standards of ethical and scholarly conduct. The program is free to dismiss the student at any time for infringement of these standards. Academic Counseling and Support: Academic Counseling and Support is available through Einstein’s Office of Academic Support and Counseling. It should be noted by students that the Center's faculty and staff are both very supportive and approachable, and that asking for support early — or late — is much preferable to infringements of the university's standards of academic integrity. The official Einstein policy document can be found here. Medical Protections Health Insurance: All students enrolled at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University are required to have basic health insurance. In order to fulfill this requirement, the College does provide, at a cost, health care coverage in the Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield Exclusive Provider Organization (EPO) plan. If you currently have health insurance through another source, you must show proof of coverage, and request a waiver of coverage from the University. Waiver of coverage forms are available from the Benefits Office, located in the Belfer Building Room 1203 on the Einstein Campus. If the waiver of coverage form is not completed and submitted to the Benefits Office by September 30th, you will be automatically enrolled (for single coverage) under the student health plan and you will be billed for this coverage. Injuries: All injuries and accidents to students while engaged in classroom work should be reported by the faculty member in charge of the course to the Einstein’s Occupational Health Services Office. Please call 718.430.3141. Students are required to report immediately to the Center of Bioethics Administrator any other injury suffered on University premises. Psychological Counseling: Affordable psychological counseling is available through the Parnes Clinic of the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, information for which can be found here. The official Einstein policy document can be found here. Student Rights Grievance Policy and Procedures: Einstein is committed to a policy of resolving all student grievances through a formal set of procedures designed to ensure that the student's issue or concern is resolved fairly. Student grievance procedures are as follows: Step 1: Students should discuss the issue or concern with their faculty adviser. Step 2: If the student thinks that the issue or concern is still unresolved by the faculty adviser the student should discuss the issue or concern with the Program Director. Step 3: If the Program Director cannot resolve the student's issue then the Program Director will convene an ad hoc committee of program faculty to address the issue. The Program Director will inform student of the committee’s decision and resolution. Privacy Rights: Einstein has adopted regulations to protect the privacy rights of its students under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974. For details, see the section below on Student Records and Privacy Rights of Students. Procedures Regarding Harassment: Albert Einstein College of Medicine is committed to maintaining an environment for research, learning and teaching that is free from even the appearance of unlawful harassment or coercion. The College has adopted a zero tolerance stance against unlawful harassment in any form, making it a violation of College policy, and declaring it antithetical to the academic values of the College. Detailed information about the College’s policy regarding harassment can be found here. Accommodations for Students with Disabilities: Einstein will coordinate reasonable accommodations and support services for eligible students. Some of the disabilities served include physical, emotional, learning disabilities, ADHD, hearing impairments, visual impairments, etc. Any student who suspects that he may have a disability or who has a documented disability is welcome to discuss it with the Program Director. Detailed information about the College's policy regarding ADA can be found here. Equal Opportunity: The University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity and nondiscrimination in admission and all other facets of its educational programs and activities. The University encourages applications from qualified students regardless of sex, religion, age, race, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, color, or national origin, within the meaning of applicable law. Inquiries concerning the University's nondiscrimination policies may be referred to the Affirmative Action Administrator, Yeshiva University, Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461-1602 attn.: Renee Coker, Diversity & Affirmative Action Officer (718.430.3771). The official Einstein policy document concerning Bioethics students' rights can be found here. Student Records and Privacy Rights Einstein Policy on FERPA: In accordance with the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 (Section 438 of the General Education Provisions Act, 20 USC 1232g), commonly referred to as the "Buckley Amendment," we take this opportunity to inform you of the Einstein policies with regards to the educational records of our students. These policies have recently been examined to assure compliance with the Privacy Act, and are made available to you in accordance with its provisions. Download the complete policy here. Students may obtain copies of this statement upon request from the Registrar. Revisions may be published from time to time to conform to the law and college policies. Suspension or Dismissal from Center Programs Suspension: In the case of a serious breach of ethical or professional conduct or in the case of serious concern for the health or safety of a student or any other person or Einstein faculty, the Program Director may, upon consultation with Center faculty and Einstein officials deemed appropriate and informed, suspend a student immediately, pending further consideration by the appropriate and informed administrative staff, wherein a recommendation can be made for subsequent return to status, return to leave, or dismissal from the program. Dismissal: Grounds for considering dismissal from the Einstein's programs include: 1) Failure of one or more graduate courses; 2) Failure of a repeated graduate course; 3) Failure of a required course, subject to the recommendation of the appropriate faculty member; 4) Failure to re-matriculate following expiration of a Leave of Absence; or 5) Participation in actions that are not commensurate with high standards of ethical or professional scholarly conduct. Einstein faculty and administration will consider all aspects of a student’s performance in evaluating his or her continued matriculation at Einstein. Recommendation for dismissal from the Certificate or Masters program can be submitted by a member of the faculty committee, but only the Program Director may dismiss a student from these programs. Appeals:A student may appeal in writing a decision of the Program Director for dismissal to the Dean of Einstein College of Medicine. Appeals must be communicated, in writing, to the Dean within fifteen days of the date of the communication of the decision for dismissal by the Program Director to the student. A student may be advised by a person from the College of Medicine in the preparation of an appeal. The Dean will consider the appeal and either sustain, modify or reverse the decision of the Program Director. The Dean's determination of the issues shall be final. The official Einstein policy document can be found here. Use of the College of Medicine's Name Usage Policy: No student or student organization may use the name of Albert Einstein College of Medicine or of the Center for Bioethics for any purpose, including identification, without written permission from Einstein and the Program and Center Directors. The official Einstein policy document can be found here.


BIOE 5311

Philosophical Perspectives on Bioethics and Autonomy

Instructors: TBA

Description:
This course will investigate some of the foundational philosophical perspectives on bioethics. We willcover four major ethical theories (deontology, utilitarianism, virtue theory, and care theory) andunderstand them through contemporary issues in bioethics. We will focus a substantial amount of ourattention on the principles and issues surrounding the concept of autonomy. We will read somefoundational work in philosophy (including Kant’s Metaphysic of Morals and Aristotle’sNicomachean Ethics), some contemporary work in philosophy (including Nedelsky’s Law’s Relationsand Hursthouse’s “Virtue Theory and Abortion”), and a variety of work on specific issues and cases inbioethics.

Prerequisites: None.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5312

Medical Narratives

Instructors: Spencer

Description:
Narratives about illness, disability and caregiving have emerged as a significant genre since the late 20thcentury. Literary, filmic and theatrical memoirs by patients and clinicians about personal experiences join anecdotal accounts in bioethics and public health. What is the historical context for such narratives, and how have they developed in recent years? How does the evolution of the genre reflect and inform the practice of healthcare and its social context? How do different narrative perspectives deepen our understanding of bioethics? This seminar will explore the breadth of works in this field, including first-person accounts by clinicians and patients, as well as critical essays about the role and status of memoir and narrative. We will investigate the relationship between these works and notions of autonomy, empathy and intersubjectivity. Some seminars will feature presentations and discussion with writers, artists and clinicians who will enrich our understanding of medical narratives.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5313

Public Health Ethics

Instructors: TBA

Description:
This course explores the many respects in which public health actions and policies have ethical dimensions. The course addresses topics in both public health practice and public health research. Topics in public health practice include an exploration of governmental paternalism and when is justified, such as laws mandating the use of seatbelts and motorcycle helmets; justifications for limiting individual liberty that arise in infectious disease practices like isolation, quarantine, and directly observed therapy; ethical problems in allocating limited resources in outbreaks or epidemics; controversies over various efforts at health promotion, such as prohibiting smoking in parks and other outdoor sites, and limiting the size of sugary soft drinks; and the role of federal regulatory agencies in protecting the health of the public. Topics in public health research include distinguishing between public health research and public health practice; when it is necessary to obtain informed consent and when it is not; ethical issues in conducting research in disasters and emergencies; when privacy and confidentiality may be breached in the interest of public health. Readings will be assigned in two categories: required and recommended. The format is interactive, seminar style, and includes cases and exercises for discussion in class. Students are expected to do all of the required readings and encouraged to do at least some of the recommended readings. Students are expected to contribute to class discussion based on the readings.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5314

Ways of Seeing: Healthcare and Ethics

Instructors: Spencer

Description:
The course will use visuality as a theme to explore embodiment, power and perspective in medical practice. We will study different models of vision from ancient thought through the enlightenment and up to the present. We will also read works on the role of sight in medical practice; the evolution of contemporary imaging techniques, and memoirs about the experience of vision loss. In addition, we will conduct “field observations” in clinical settings, investigating the role of vision as it exemplifies relations of power and knowledge. We will thus use vision as a lens ---both literal and figurative --- to explore social relations and medical ethics.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5315

Reproductive Ethics and the Law

Instructors: Flicker

Description:
This course will explore legal and ethical issues raised by reproduction and the use of assisted reproductive technologies. We will study legal theory and practice involving contraception, assisted reproduction, abortion, sterilization, and personhood. We will approach these topics using a wide range of sources, including legal cases, historical scholarship, and bioethics literature. Grades will be determined by class participation and a final paper.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5316

Brave New World: Bioethics in Literature and Film

Instructors: Spencer

Description:
What do Chekhov and Dr. House have in common? Why did Huxley’s 1932 novel Brave New World so uncannily anticipate the dilemmas of our era? What can we learn from the way certain stories have been told and re-told over time? How have our cultural views of genetic engineering, social conditioning, organ transplantation, plague and contagion, fetal research and utilitarian ethics changed — or have they? From 1930s cinema to Gattaca, from Tom Hanks in Philadelphia to documentary reportage, from Margaret Atwood to tales of contemporary transnational surrogacy, from Tolstoy to E.R., from zombies to Artificial Intelligence — in this seminar we will investigate bioethics in literature, film and television, with reference to critical essays and with an emphasis on dynamic classroom discussion and debate.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5317

Organ Transplantation

Instructors: Hoffman

Description:
Like most advances in medical technology the advent of organ transplantation has produced both anticipated, and unanticipated, benefits and dilemmas. This course will explore the clinical and ethical history of organ donation and transplantation, as well as the ethical challenges society will face as we contemplate ways to expand the availability of transplantable organs. Topics will include: the relevance of death; appropriate criteria for determining death, the importance of respecting the decisions of donors for donation after death, the moral justification for the presumption against donation and the risk of reversing that presumption, and scientific alternatives to transplantation, among other topics. While this will not be a course on the law of organ transplantation, we will cover the federal acts that created the US transplant system and the regulation of the regional Organ Procurement Organizations (OPO) and the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). Readings will include scholarly papers from the bioethics and medical literature, American and international practice standards and regulations, codes of ethics for organ and tissue transplantation, narrative accounts of the experiences of individual donors and recipients, and reports in the lay press that describe and define public perceptions of the transplant system. Classes will be conducted utilizing the Socratic method. Grading will be based on class participation, including role-play exercises, and a paper on the ethical future of the transplant industry.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5318

Dementia, Ethics and Health Policy

Instructors: Powell

Description:
The course will explore a range of ethical issues arising from dementia, including diagnosis, treatment, research, and health policies. The course begins by studying definitions of different types of dementia and related states, such as minimal cognitive impairment and cognitive aging. Topics include: neuropathology of dementia, as well as current trends – and failures -- in research for dementia treatments; factors that increase and decrease the probability of developing dementia, including through life-style choices; caregiver burdens and stressors; abuse, neglect and financial scams affecting those with cognitive impairment; safe driving and public health concerns; use of technology to support independent living; nursing home quality and functions; and end of life care for severe dementia. Though the course will address scientific topics, students need not have an extensive background in the sciences. For each topic, the class will identify and analyze related ethical challenges related to dementia.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5321

Care of those with Diminished Decision-Making Capacity

Instructors: Hoffman

Description:
The course will focus on the clinical, legal and ethical implications of treating patients who fall between the polls of full autonomous decision-making capacity and those who lack any decision-making capacity at all. We will explore the clinical implications of partially capacitated patients in separate diagnostic and therapeutic settings. We will separately examine patients whose decisional capacity is compromised by mental illness, intellectual disability, age-related dementia, transient disease triggered impairment, latrogenic injury and infancy. The class is designed to develop ethical consultation skills for students with either legal or clinical professional experience or interests. Readings will be drawn from court decisions, legislative and regulatory guidance, professional ethical codes, scholarly literature in law, and ethics and medicine (including neuro-science and moral philosophy.) Students will engage in role-playing exercises in and out of class, and will be expected to make at least one case presentation during class.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5322

Images of Mental Illness

Instructors: Powell

Description:
The course will explore images of mental illness from the nineteenth century to the present. We will use materials from the psychiatric literature, news accounts, fiction, biographies, film, and patient narratives. Key themes include: what is mental illness? How have health professionals and society responded to those with mental illness over time? In what ways have those responses changed from the nineteenth century to the present? Why does mental illness generate stigma? How has mental illness overlapped with other sources of stigma, such as poverty, gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity? What are ongoing ethics challenges in treating mental illness.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5323

Feminist Bioethics

Instructors: TBA

Description:
This course will examine various feminist critiques of mainstream bioethics and explore the growth of feminist bioethics as its own distinct sub-field. We will work through feminist conceptions of autonomy and personhood, and discuss how those conceptions affect decision making with respect to medical interventions. We will focus upon ethical questions and cases that highlight feminist concerns about reproductive choice, reproductive technology, dependency and disability, gender and sex, and power imbalances. Lastly, we will explore global responsibility toward the provision of healthcare. Students will be evaluated based upon their level or participation in class discussions and upon reflective written work.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5400

Capstone/Thesis Project

Instructors: TBD

Description:
This course is a fundamental requirement for the masters degree. It consists of the post-proposal research, practice, writing and revision for an extended project, under the guidance of an advisor in the relevant field, selected from the faculty of Cardozo, Einstein or Yeshiva. A student may register for all 4 credits in one semester, or for 2 credits each in two consecutive semesters.

Credit: 2-4



BIOE 5200

Bioethics Mediation (Intensive)

Instructors: Carol Liebman and Tia Powell

Description:
This four-day course is an intensive seminar taught by the national leaders in bioethics mediation. Mediation is a vital tool for managing and resolving conflicts between and among health care staff and families. Mediation helps all parties to articulate their values and acknowledges the perspectives of all participants. The course covers essential techniques through video-taped role plays, brief lectures, exercises and intensive individual feedback.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5201

Bioethics Consultation Skills

Instructors: Course Director: Hannah I. Lipman, MD MS

Description:
Drawing upon the decades of experience of Montefiore’s Bioethics Consultation service, the faculty of the Montefiore-Einstein Center for Bioethics will cover selected topics from the ASBH's Core Competencies. The course will help students develop communication skills, master the process of bioethics consultation and gain practical experience in approaching ethical dilemmas in clinical medicine. Note that this course is designed for those currently serving on a hospital ethics committee or in a consultation service or with a background in bioethics and seeking clinical training. It may be taken on its own or as part of the Masters Program.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5203

Jewish Medical Ethics

Instructors: Edward Reichman

Description:
Judaism is one of the world’s oldest religions with a rich heritage and an expansive legal literary tradition dating back to the times of the Bible and Talmud. Judaism has a unique approach to medical ethical dilemmas that can contribute to modern ethical discourse. This course will provide students with a basic introduction to the principles of Jewish law as they relate to medical ethics. These principles will then be applied to issues in contemporary medical ethics ranging from beginning of life to end of life. Topics analyzed will include abortion, contraception, infertility, genetics, cloning, organ transplantation, the definition of death, autopsy and stem cell research. In addition, new frontiers in science and medicine will be explored through the lens of Jewish law. The contribution of principles of Jewish medical ethics to the broader dialogue of modern bioethics will be discussed. Readings will be drawn from ancient rabbinic texts, as well as modern authors on Jewish bioethics. Emphasis will be placed on textual analysis of primary and secondary sources (in English translation) culled from over two thousand years of rabbinic literature.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5204

Narrative Ethics and Bioethics

Instructors: Previously offered

Description:
The course will introduce students to the fields of narrative ethics, narrative medicine, and narrative bioethics. They will become well-versed in the ethics of reading, the ethics of writing, and the power both practices have to affect decision-making and care.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2



BIOE 5205

Institutional Policy Writing

Instructors: Flicker

Description:
In this intensive, students will learn about the ethical, legal, and administrative considerations that go into the writing of an institutional policy. Through lectures, readings, and discussions, the class will study the philosophical and historical backgrounds of policies, and analyze policies from hospitals across the country. In the last two days of class, students will break into small groups to develop their own policies; at the end of this period the class will come together as an ethics committee to debate the merits of each policy.

Prerequisites: Certificate program or instructor permission.

Credit: 2


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